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EDITORIAL
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 33

COVID – Resuming A New Norm


Department of Paediatrics, Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital, Hong Kong, China

Date of Submission19-Apr-2021
Date of Acceptance19-Apr-2021
Date of Web Publication06-May-2021

Correspondence Address:
Daniel K Ng
Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital, 2, Village Road, Happy Valley, Hong Kong
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2543-0343.315581

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How to cite this article:
Ng DK. COVID – Resuming A New Norm. Pediatr Respirol Crit Care Med 2020;4:33

How to cite this URL:
Ng DK. COVID – Resuming A New Norm. Pediatr Respirol Crit Care Med [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Jun 19];4:33. Available from: https://www.prccm.org/text.asp?2020/4/3/33/315581



April 2021 sees the global mortality reaching 3 million and the ongoing vaccination campaign continues at full speed in the developed countries. What is worrying is the situation in developing countries where the availability of COVID vaccines remains scarce.

For children, COVID is usually mild and self-limited. However, it might not be the case for those with risk factors like young age or organ failure. Prof. E Lee and Prof. SJ Hong[1] presented a comprehensive account of the clinical spectrum of paediatric COVID. Co-infection is not uncommon in paediatric COVID leading to pneumonia and parapneumonic pleural effusion. Prof. YJ Wei and colleagues[2] reported their findings of follow-up lung functions after treatment with or without fibrinolytic. Early use of fibrinolytic was found to be associated with less abnormal lung functions at follow-up. This is certainly in line with the current recommendation regarding use of fibrinolytic in complicated pneumonia with effusion.

Other infections continue though at a lower rate because of the infection control measures. Tuberculosis is notably one of the most threatening infections especially in the developing countries already hammered by the COVID. Prof. W Anuntaseree and colleagues[3] reported an important observation that serum adenosine deaminase was not correlated with tuberculin skin test. So, MT 2 remains the investigation of choice, cheap and effective.

COVID sees a new norm in CME for doctors, i.e. telemedicine, webinar, zoom, etc. This new mode of communication allows a much cheaper and speedier information flow between doctors from different countries. I would appeal readers to send us the information about virtual conference held in your countries and we would disseminate to all members of APPS. Meanwhile, stay safe and well.



 
  References Top

1.
Lee E, Hong SJ. Clinical spectrum of pediatric coronavirus disease 2019 infection. Pediatr Respirol Crit Care Med 2020;4;34-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Anuntaseree W, Tangjitrapitak W, Sriphongphankul H, Ruangnapa K, Saelim K, Prasertsan P. Serum adenosine deaminase and tuberculin skin test in children with tuberculosis contact. Pediatr Respirol Crit Care Med;2020;4:37-40.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Wei YJ, Ju YT, Hsieh ML, Wu MH, Wu JM, Wang JN. A follow-up study for pulmonary function evaluation in children with complicated parapneumonic effusion. Pediatr Respirol Crit Care Med 2020;4:41-5.  Back to cited text no. 3
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