• Users Online: 120
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 60-64

Usefulness of obstructive sleep apnea-18 as a predictor of moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea in children who have normal/inconclusive McGill oximetry score


1 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pulmonology and Critical Care, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

Correspondence Address:
Suchada Sritippayawan
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pulmonology and Critical Care, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Rama IV Road,Bangkok 10330
Thailand
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/prcm.prcm_14_19

Rights and Permissions

Context: Overnight oximetry is a screening test for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, those who demonstrate normal/inconclusive test still require diagnostic polysomnography (PSG). Since PSG has a long waiting list, an adjunct simple test for the prioritization would be helpful. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine whether the OSA-18 quality of life (QoL) questionnaire could predict moderate-to-severe OSA in children with normal/inconclusive overnight oximetry. Settings and Design: The study involves a cross-sectional study at a university hospital. Subjects and Methods: Overnight PSG and QoL assessed by the Thai-Version OSA-18 were performed in snoring children with normal/inconclusive overnight oximetry. Statistical Analysis: Unpaired Student's t-test, Chi-square, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were used. Results: A total of 218 children (age 6.4 ± 2.5 years, 62% male) were studied. Sixty percent had moderate-to-severe OSA, while 40% had primary snoring/mild OSA. The mean total OSA-18 score was not different between the two groups. Subgroup analysis among those who never had medical treatment for OSA (n = 55) showed a higher total OSA-18 score in moderate-to-severe compared to primary snoring/mild OSA groups (80.5 ± 10.7 vs. 72.2 ± 14.4; P = 0.02). Total OSA-18 score >78 was the best cutoff value for predicting moderate-to-severe OSA (61.5% sensitivity, 80% specificity, 72.7% positive predictive value, and 69.7% negative predictive value). Combining this cutoff value with overweight/obesity did not improve its predictivity. Conclusions: We found the association between high total OSA-18 score and moderate-to-severe OSA in snoring children who had normal/inconclusive overnight oximetry and never had medical treatment for OSA. However, the best cutoff value of the score and other potential add-on parameters are still needed to be investigated.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed190    
    Printed11    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded55    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal