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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 81-85

Airway disease and environmental aeroallergens in eczematics approaching adulthood


1 Department of Paediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
2 Division of Biostatistics, Jockey Club School of Public Health and Primary Care, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

Correspondence Address:
Ellis Kam Lun Hon
Department of Paediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/prcm.prcm_18_17

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Background: Atopic eczema (AE) is one of the most common skin diseases affecting children and adults worldwide. The “Atopic March” paradigm suggests AE is part of a complex condition with related airway disease. Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of airway disease, environmental aeroallergens, and review factors associated with eczema severity and quality of life (QoL) when AE patients approached adulthood. Methods: Patients who were diagnosed with AE at a young age were included in the study and followed up till their adolescence at pediatric dermatology clinics from 2000 to 2017. Demographic characteristics, clinical laboratory parameters, treatment history, personal atopic history, as well as disease outcomes assessed by Nottingham Eczema Severity Score (NESS) and Children Dermatology Quality Life Index (CDLQI) were reviewed. Results: Three hundred and eighty-three patients (55.4% males) with latest NESS at mean (standard deviation) age 16.23 (2.50) years were reviewed. Personal history of asthma (45%), allergic rhinitis (74%), and family history of atopy were prevalent. Seventy-two percent of the patients were skin prick testing positive for house dust mite, 27% for cockroach, 33% for cat fur, and 13% for dog fur. Fourteen percent reported “smokers in family”. Multiple logistic regression showed “food avoidance ever” (adjusted odds ratio [OR] =3.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.08–8.32; P = 0.035) and log-transformed immunoglobulin E (IgE) (adjusted OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.09–1.92; P = 0.011) were significantly associated with more severe AE. Linear regression showed “food avoidance ever” (β = 1.79, 95% CI = 0.34–3.24; P = 0.016), higher log-transformed IgE (β = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.22–1.03; P = 0.003), dog dander sensitization (β = 2.07, 95% CI = 0.24–3.89; P = 0.027), and severe disease (β = 2.97, 95% CI = 2.26–3.68; P < 0.001) were significantly associated with QoL impairment. Conclusions: A number of patients do not grow out of their eczema, and many of them have allergic rhinitis and asthma co-morbidities. Toward adulthood, AE severity and QoL are associated with food avoidance and high IgE, but generally independent of family or personal history of airway disease and allergen sensitization. Blood IgE measurement may help assess the risk for more severe eczema when patients are becoming adults.


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